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Vicki Gabereau. October 27, 2000
Host: Vicki Gabereau


VICKI GABEREAU TELEVISION INTERVIEW

As filming for the fourth season of Stargate SG-1 ended, Richard appeared on Vicki Gabereau, a Canadian talk show from Vancouver. Taped on October 20th, his appearance aired on October 27th, and included a visit from Stargate SG-1 executive producer Brad Wright.

Vicki Gabereau:
Oh, hi. I'm Vicki Gabereau. I have to tell you I can hardly believe who I have on the show today because we've been nagging him and torturing him for three years to come on the show...it's Richard Dean Anderson...

He's the star of two extraordinarily successful series, Stargate SG-1 and MacGyver, which has become a verb, both shot in this city. Yesterday he finished shooting the fourth season of Stargate SG-1 and I'm very happy to say that before he gets on the plane to go home, we've trapped him. Richard Dean Anderson, hello.

Richard Dean Anderson:
Hi Vic. [Turning to the audience] I made it.

Vicki Gabereau:
I know, it's great. So is your name "Dean-Anderson," hyphenated? Or is it Richard Dean with the middle name Dean and...or what?

Richard Dean Anderson:
Well oddly, it used to be. When I...'cause it's always been Rick. Growing up I was Rick or Ricky, but when I had to join a union called the Screen Actors Guild... you all may have heard of it. I won't go any further with it than that. [Referring to the recent strike by the Screen Actors Guild] But there was a Rick Anderson, or a Richard Anderson, and I had to change it to what it really was, which was Richard Dean. I had to use all three of them. [Laughing] This is the longest answer to a short question.

Vicki Gabereau:
That's good, that's what we like. We like really long answers. Minute builders.

Richard Dean Anderson:
But I did have to hyphenate it for a while, like Ann-Margret or something like that, but eventually I just said, and the Union did say "Screw it, let's just... you can be Richard Dean."

Vicki Gabereau:
Oh, that's good.

Richard Dean Anderson:
Yeah.

Vicki Gabereau:
Fine. Anyway, you've been working like a dog ever since you decided to trod the boards, it seems to me. I mean, you look at the list of credits and the things you've done. It's quite a bit... quite a lot of stuff.

Richard Dean Anderson:
I'm a little tired.

Vicki Gabereau:
Are ya?

Richard Dean Anderson:
A little tired. Yeah. [Laughing] I had been accused a long time...sometime ago... accused by no less than a therapist that said, "You're a bit of a workaholic, aren't you?" It's just, I finally took a little perspective step back and acknowledged that I was, had been, sort of thrived on the nature of work. Certainly on the machinery of doing series television. When Stargate came along, I had done MacGyver for seven years and that... you know, I was youngish, and...

Vicki Gabereau:
Younger.

Richard Dean Anderson:
Yeah, and had a lot of energy and just, you know... I didn't have a family and...

Vicki Gabereau:
No responsibilities.

Richard Dean Anderson:
Right. I was very capable of keeping up the pace of doing an episodic television show. So after MacGyver I was ready to kind of take a rest and move on, which I did. I did several TV movies, traveled some, a bit, and then Stargate came along. MGM approached me and asked if I would care to be involved with the project. I met with Brad Wright...

Vicki Gabereau:
Who's going to come later.

Richard Dean Anderson:
Yeah, and I was very, duly impressed by the team that MGM had put together and the franchise itself just seemed like the perfect launching pad to get back into series television.

Vicki Gabereau:
[Remarking on the pun] Launching pad. Ha ha. I get it.

Richard Dean Anderson:
So to speak! And so you know, I like the machinery of doing episodic television. It's really... I mean it's nine months of... it's a bit of a grind because it's nine months, a block of time that we're... I'm up at 5:30 in the morning, until we're done. But there's a machinery to it. We have a producer name of John Smith from Vancouver, who just knows how to put the machinery together, and Brad and his crew know how to write to anticipate what our needs are going to be. And it all... they've made it as comfortable and easy as possible for me.

RDA on Vicki RDA on Vicki

Vicki Gabereau:
Do you know what I like about it? First of all, I think it's a great show and I watch it whenever I can, but what I really like about it is that you seem so dour, and yet once in a while you do such funny, goofy things. That is, for example, I really like it that you correct people's grammar.

Richard Dean Anderson:
[Laughs]

Vicki Gabereau:
See now, I am really keen on that and it's hard to do that in life because people hate you.

Richard Dean Anderson:
Yes, people do hate me for that, I swear.

Vicki Gabereau:
Do you do it anyway? In real life?

Richard Dean Anderson:
Well, Brad has, I think, either given up on me in saying what is actually written, or actually taken that aspect of me, Richard Dean, and written it into the character, which, I think, he has tended to do. He has found the voice of the character better than any of the writers we have, but he knows this quality about me. My father, when I was growing up, was an educator, speech and English teacher. My mother is an artist, so I grew up with the humanities around me, very aware of grammar. Language... it's one of my favorite things with which to communicate. [He grins at the intentionally proper construction of that sentence, and Vicki responds by leaning back in her chair and praising him.]

Vicki Gabereau:
Thank you!

Richard Dean Anderson:
[Grinning] Yeah, not bad.

Vicki Gabereau:
No... very well constructed, sir.

Richard Dean Anderson:
So occasionally there will be a little bit of a slip, but Brad is writing to that now. I mean, out of this... I so love the character now because I'm making him as dense as possible, not slow, just a little thick. So he's... a lot of the humor that comes out of... the droll or dryness that comes out of...

Vicki Gabereau:
Well there's a "wait for it" quality. There's a kind of beat...

Richard Dean Anderson:
Or, not only that but, "Did he just say that? Did he really...?" And it goes by.

Vicki Gabereau:
Well like, you're thinking! It's not just... That's what I really like about it, and I love the character. I think he's very fun.

Richard Dean Anderson:
It's fun. That aspect is a ball to play.

Vicki Gabereau:
You could've been a professional hockey player, maybe?

Richard Dean Anderson:
Nah... Come on, let's be honest. [Laughing]

Vicki Gabereau:
You can lie now, who cares?

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Richard Dean Anderson:
Well now I can be honest. No. Yeah, I mean those were my aspirations when I was growing up. I grew up in Minnesota, and you know, you skated growing up as a kid. But I broke a couple of... It's an old story... But I broke two arms in a matter of three weeks, I guess, and the second of which put me in the hospital for about three months and...

Vicki Gabereau:
In the hospital for three months with a broken arm??

Richard Dean Anderson:
It shattered. It was dangling backwards and just kind of...

Vicki Gabereau:
[Cringing from the description] Oh, gosh. Oh, stop!

Richard Dean Anderson:
[Turning to the audience] Shall I go on? This is a sci-fi interview after all. No, it was bad... I have pins in here and I'm just held together with staples. So that sort of dashed the aggressive nature that you really need to play professionally.

Vicki Gabereau:
What age were you?

Richard Dean Anderson:
Fifteen, I think, at the time?

Vicki Gabereau:
But you still play once in a while?

Richard Dean Anderson:
I did until... It's been about a year since I've skated. My knees are shot now. [Joins sympathetic laughter from the audience] Oh God... I'm bionic. [Laughing]

Vicki Gabereau:
[Joining his tone of voice] It's so depressing. My right knee is going...

Richard Dean Anderson:
I might as well be Lee Majors, for heaven's sake. [Laughing with the audience] So I ski now. I get all braced up. I have... that's my major passion now. I've stopped jumping off cliffs, and my extreme days are kinda over.

Vicki Gabereau:
Race cars?

Richard Dean Anderson:
I will, on invitation, sure, yeah. At least you've got metal and stuff around you with which to protect yourself. [Laughing again at the deliberate sentence construction]

Vicki Gabereau:
[Missing the grammar reference] That's right. Except that you do have a kiddo.

Richard Dean Anderson:
I do... the most glorious child I've ever had, I tell ya. She's my only child. Yeah, Wylie, she's the joy of my life. She is actually, aside from a bicycle trip I took when I was seventeen years old through the wilds of Canada and the Yukon, she serves as the apex of a big turn in my life.

Vicki Gabereau:
Second part of your life.

Richard Dean Anderson:
Yeah. I turned fifty in January, so I waited a long time.

Vicki Gabereau:
No kidding... You and Mr. Trudeau.

Richard Dean Anderson:
Yeah?

Vicki Gabereau:
He was seventy-one when he produced the last one.

Richard Dean Anderson:
So I've got time for a couple more?

Vicki Gabereau:
You have time. You can have, like, an army.
[To the audience] Okay, so we'll take a break, and be back with Richard Dean Anderson.

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[Richard and Vicki are talking with each other as they return from the commercial break, and Vicki turns to the audience.]

Vicki Gabereau:
We don't have time to do an interview. We're just talking away. So, Stargate SG-1 is the vehicle, the starring vehicle for Richard Dean Anderson. And this summer, he did something interesting... [Turning to Richard who is looking off camera, reading the teleprompter] Stop reading!

Richard Dean Anderson:
[Turning back from the teleprompter and grinning] I'm fascinated by all aspects of television.

Vicki Gabereau:
National Geographic did a special and you and young Kennedy, Bobby, went up not very far from here, to this extraordinarily beautiful place and tromped around. Now, it did look like you were hacking and wheezing your way through this... but really, you took a plane in.

Richard Dean Anderson:
Well, in the trip, I mean, with all due respect to what you saw or what was filmed...

Vicki Gabereau:
[Indicating the monitor behind them where a clip from National Geographic Explorer begins playing] There it is.

Richard Dean Anderson:
[Watching some of the footage of the excursion he took with Bobby Kennedy through the wilderness of Headwall Canyon] National Geographic, yeah. No, we're doing that. This is actually... Folks, just so you know, those of you from B.C., this is out there. This is like within 150 miles of Vancouver, it's northeast of Cortez and inland a bit. We float-plane it into the Toba Inlet and then took a helicopter over the glaciers and into this pristine arena, and it is just... It's inside the Kalhoose Nation's territory. The issue at hand was... The whole trip was basically an effort to highlight the plight of the Klahoose Nation over there in trying to protect the forest, basically, the land up there, from the clear cutting ritual of the lumber industry. Basically what it is, is that the Klahoose Nation own the rights to the access to all of that area, and they've been blocking them for twelve years. The industry has a contract to go in, and can log that, but they can't get to it any other way but through Klahoose Nations.

Vicki Gabereau:
And that's being prevented.

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Richard Dean Anderson:
That's how they're blocking it, and if they do get in there, and I don't want to get too preachy about this, but if the lumber companies do get in and start logging that area, you're never going to see that. And that's what the piece sort of points out briefly. It touches on it, 'cause National Geographic has to kind of walk a fine line, a fairness line.

Vicki Gabereau:
They do. As do we all.

Richard Dean Anderson:
But that arena will be just raped if it's allowed to be logged the way the logging companies want to. The Klahoose Nation want to work in conjunction with it to help eco-manage the whole arena, because it's not that they don't want the commerce, or to share in the commerce that's available there. They just don't want it to go the ways of the past.

Vicki Gabereau:
The lawnmower way.

Richard Dean Anderson:
Yeah, because it, believe me, it has a snowball effect. You lose your rivers, obviously your hillsides, and it is just, it really does... it's cancerous. Once you lose the hills, or the trees on the sides of hillsides, the rest of it just starts going away. So it behooves you to politically stay in touch with who's supporting such issues.

Vicki Gabereau:
How did you find out about this? Is Bobby Kennedy your buddy, who called you?

Richard Dean Anderson:
Well, no no no... I actually... Well, I met Bobby as a result of this trip. I was in Colorado at a charity raising function. I actually bid on an auction item which... and the benefactor of, or beneficiary of the event, was the River Keeper Alliance, or the Water Keeper Alliance, that Bobby is the chief litigator for out of Pace College. So I donated some money and on top of it came this trip, and that's where we met. We bonded immediately, it's really become... it's gelled into a very nice... It's odd for a guy my age to meet a gaggle of humanity that have so much in common, and Bobby and I... I am so in awe of him. He's one of the most impassioned, articulate guys I've ever met, but most specifically on issues of the environment.

Vicki Gabereau:
It's nice that he's turned out so well.

Richard Dean Anderson:
Yeah, he's been through his ebbs and flows, if you will.

Vicki Gabereau:
Indeed. But it's a good point that at sort of our age, that to make a new friend, it's hard at a certain stage. Especially you, who is so public, you never really know... It's kind of hard...

Richard Dean Anderson:
Yeah, I know what you mean, and it's absolutely true. I left home when I was pretty young, and got on the road...

Vicki Gabereau:
Why?

Richard Dean Anderson:
To just take a look around.

Vicki Gabereau:
Fifteen? I wouldn't have let you go. I would have just said, "You're not going!"

Richard Dean Anderson:
Well, had you been my mother, I think...

Vicki Gabereau:
You would have gone fourteen!

Richard Dean Anderson:
First of all, you'd be much older than you are. No, it was just born of... I'm a child of... I was born in 1950, so I'm essentially a child of the 60's and 70's. [Turning toward the audience] Now, there's no one in this room that's old enough to really remember those... Well, there's a young lady right there that may remember the era... But there was a lot going on culturally and sociologically, particularly in the United States. I know it was global but having grown up in the States, that was my arena of experience. And it was just something innate, something born of a need to go out, and I was hopping freights and hitchhiking all over the place. Again, I rode a bicycle from Minneapolis to the Yukon and back and it was all...

Vicki Gabereau:
Not by yourself, though?

Richard Dean Anderson:
I started with two buddies and after a month we... some of them went...

Vicki Gabereau:
Couldn't stand each other?

Richard Dean Anderson:
No, it was just...

Vicki Gabereau:
What happened with Vietnam and you?

Richard Dean Anderson:
I scooted it. I skirted the whole thing. I mean, I'm colorblind, so that helped.

RDA on Vicki RDA on Vicki

Vicki Gabereau:
[Referring to Richard's blue sweater and joking] Is that why you're wearing that lime green sweater?

Richard Dean Anderson:
[Looking down at his sweater and laughing] I was told it was bluish, so I'm not sure.

Vicki Gabereau:
Do you have to have your socks labeled?

Richard Dean Anderson:
[Grinning] I should, but I only wear white socks. So I'm...

Vicki Gabereau:
White socks?!?

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Richard Dean Anderson:
Hey, look.

Vicki Gabereau:
Oh, yuck!

Richard Dean Anderson:
Come on! [Richard raises up his leg to the desk to show the audience the white socks he is wearing with black shoes, as the audience laughs and applauds.]

Vicki Gabereau:
Oh, very nice!

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Richard Dean Anderson:
[Using his Ernest Pratt voice to the audience] Thank you!
Black or white socks. I don't go for...

Vicki Gabereau:
Oh, black. Okay fine. But with a dinner jacket, tuxedo situation?

Richard Dean Anderson:
What? You got a problem with that?

Vicki Gabereau:
Well... uh... yeah.

Richard Dean Anderson:
What color socks you got?

Vicki Gabereau:
Well, I've got black socks on, and I got my black shoes on. [She also raises up one leg to show the audience as they applaud.]

Richard Dean Anderson:
Stylin'. Very stylin'.

Vicki Gabereau:
My mother said I look like a fireplug if I don't wear black socks, so, you know what? I believed her. [Richard laughs] Where were we? I have no idea. Finding friends, going on trips, bicycling around, 60's, 70's...

Richard Dean Anderson:
Yeah. All that and more. You were making the point about meeting people.

Vicki Gabereau:
Yeah, was I?

Richard Dean Anderson:
This trip for National Geographic really did bring together quite a heady group.

Vicki Gabereau:
Yeah, looked good.

Richard Dean Anderson:
A member of the NRDC and Sierra Club, and Kathy Francis, Chief Kathy from the Klahoose Nation, so it was intellectually very stimulating and very enlightening.

Vicki Gabereau:
How long was it?

Richard Dean Anderson:
We were just gone eight... seven days, I think. But we ran the length of that river. Again, I'm not a soapbox kind of guy, but it really behooves globally to think in these terms specifically to British Columbia. You know what you have here in part, but if you want to protect that which is your backyard, really become aware politically about who is willing to go to bat for people like the Klahoose Nation, who are willing to stand up and protect... fight to protect, well... your backyard.

Vicki Gabereau:
So in one scene in this National Geographic special you see himself... Look, if I give you these, can you still do this? [Vicki hands him three soft balls for juggling.]

Richard Dean Anderson:
Oh yeah!

Vicki Gabereau:
Juggle, baby! Can you do it sitting down?

Richard Dean Anderson:
Yeah, I think so. [Richard moves his chair back to give himself room.]

Vicki Gabereau:
Don't go falling over now... Kill the movie star...

Richard Dean Anderson:
Yeah, that would be just the old stunt days.

[Richard begins to juggle the three balls, finally throwing one high and deliberately letting it fall to the ground, as the audience cheers and applauds.]

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Vicki Gabereau:
What we make some people do around here. Do you do this all the time?

Richard Dean Anderson:
This is how I started. I swear to God, it may be how I finish, I'm not sure. [Laughter]

Vicki Gabereau:
I've never been able to do it. I know it's like this, you have to start by doing this... [She repeatedly throws one ball in the air and catches it single handed.]

Richard Dean Anderson:
Throwing them in the air, yeah...

Vicki Gabereau:
Like this, and then you go like this... yeah...
[The audience laughs and she catches his sarcasm at this point, grins, mutters "Get out...!" and playfully throws the ball at him. Richard laughs, and Vicki turns to the audience.] I'll be right back with Richard Dean Anderson!

[There is a commercial break. When they return, Brad Wright has joined them, and they are chatting and laughing.]

Richard Dean Anderson:
[Referring to his water mug] I've got the green one.

Vicki Gabereau:
[To Brad] I'm not going to ask you to juggle. Okay...
[To the audience] So, Richard Dean Anderson remains and now we're joined by one of the show's executive producers and writers, Brad Wright. How do you do?

Brad Wright:
Very good, thanks.

Vicki Gabereau:
When you look at the credits of your show, there's a lot of brass on that show.

Richard Dean Anderson:
A lot of Brads?

Vicki Gabereau:
Yeah. Ha ha. Brass.

Brad Wright:
You mean a lot of executive producers?

Vicki Gabereau:
Yes.

Brad Wright:
Yeah, we had four at one point, I think we're going to have four again next year. Well, Rick has to be an executive producer, and so does his partner Michael, because when you change as many lines as he does you have to have the authority to do that. [They laugh.]

Richard Dean Anderson:
[Laughing] You gotta justify it.

Vicki Gabereau:
What kind of lines does he change?

Brad Wright:
Aw, he doesn't change much. He likes to ad lib humor. I mean, we'll try to write a joke for him and it'll still be very funny but it'll be a slightly different joke.

Vicki Gabereau:
Yes, of course, I understand that. You really can't... It's very hard to write jokes for people.

Brad Wright:
What's really funny...

Vicki Gabereau:
Especially when you're funny innately.

Brad Wright:
That's true.

Vicki Gabereau:
And so you have to deliver your own kind of jokes. [Addressing Richard] I'm on your side.

Richard Dean Anderson:
[Indicating Brad] This is one of the most patient human beings I've ever met in my life. [Brad laughs at the compliment, and nods in agreement as he continues.] Because early read-throughs were really kind of brutal for the writers, 'cause there was no mercy. None of the actors had any sense of how hard these guys work.

Brad Wright:
And it's a science fiction show, so let's face it, you know, when actors who have never done science fiction start reading this stuff about aliens... It's difficult for them, so...

Vicki Gabereau:
Yeah.

Richard Dean Anderson:
Yeah, we've tempered our need to comment on maybe some elements of it, or some particular delivery or tone... but not enough. They need more respect, they work harder than anyone around.

Brad Wright:
It's fun, though, when we do get feedback from the actors. I mean they've been playing the characters...

Vicki Gabereau:
"It's fun when we get feedback from the actors."

Brad Wright:
It is!

Vicki Gabereau:
[To Richard] Remember he said that.

Richard Dean Anderson:
"Mooo..." [Richard begins to imitate the sounds of cows and a cattle prod, pretending to herd cattle.] "Over there..." [Laughter]

Vicki Gabereau:
Okay, so we're going to look at a clip. This is apparently a funny bit. Did you write this part?

Brad Wright:
No, I didn't.

Vicki Gabereau:
I see. Okay, fine.

Brad Wright:
Robert Cooper wrote this.

Vicki Gabereau:
Oh, Robert Cooper. The former ombudsman, Robert Cooper?

Brad Wright:
No, actually, there's a lot of Robert Coopers. He's our co-executive producer...

Vicki Gabereau:
Well he could be the same one...

Brad Wright:
Actually the name on the script... This is what often happens in television... The name on the script and the name on the show is written by David Rich, who wrote the story, but it was a fairly heavy rewrite.

Vicki Gabereau:
It's too complicated!

Brad Wright:
It is, I know...

Vicki Gabereau:
Can't we just watch it?

Brad Wright:
Go ahead.

Vicki Gabereau:
Okay, fine.

[They run a clip from the episode Upgrades, the scene in the General's office from "We ought to be out kicking some Goa'uld butt!" to "Just get the hell out of my office!" When they return, the three of them are smiling, as the audience applauds.]

Vicki Gabereau:
It's pretty funny, you have to admit. Now, how much of that was scripted? Do you even remember?

Brad Wright:
All of it. That whole scene was scripted.

Vicki Gabereau:
See, those actors for ya, huh? They're good at that. I love Don S. Davis.

Brad Wright:
He's great, isn't he? [Richard nods in agreement.]

Vicki Gabereau:
Oh yeah, he is. So you could've just sort of made that up as you were going along, but no...

Richard Dean Anderson:
You know, all you do is just tweak it for rhythm, that's all you do, but if the basics are there... But, the words happened to have been there for this one.

Vicki Gabereau:
Why is it "Stargate SG-1"?

Brad Wright:
[In an aside to Richard, jokingly referring to the wording of his previous comment, but he is cut off by Vicki] "The words just happened to have been there for this one..." [They both laugh.]

Vicki Gabereau:
[Realizing that she cut him off] I almost stepped on that.

Brad Wright:
It was one of those rare occasions, that's correct.

Richard Dean Anderson:
Here I am trying to pay a compliment... [They both laugh.]

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Vicki Gabereau:
Get over it! How come it's called "SG-1", though? It's, like, complicated now.

Brad Wright:
Well, that was because at the time, the president of MGM said, "You should come up with another name in addition to Stargate," and Jonathan, who co-created the show with me, said, "I dunno, something like SG-1." He just threw it off the top of his head, but we saw it in print ads a couple of weeks later.

Vicki Gabereau:
And it looked cool?

Brad Wright:
And that's the way we got stuck with it.

Vicki Gabereau:
Okay, what happened to the guy that had the engraving thing on his head? It doesn't seem to be there anymore. What do you do, like, pry it off?

Brad Wright:
[Realizing that she is referring to the as-yet unaired episode 2010] Oh, in that episode... You saw an episode in the future where he doesn't have it anymore.

Vicki Gabereau:
Oh, how did you get it off?

Brad Wright:
[Answering as if she is referring to the actor] It's not permanent. It's a stick-on thing. [Vicki grins, and the audience laughs. Richard whistles as if the joke is flying over heads.]

Vicki Gabereau:
[Laughing] Well, I didn't know what planet he was from so I didn't know whether it was stick-on or whether it came with...!

Brad Wright:
Well, it's Christopher Judge and he's from Earth, and he does shave his head every day.

Vicki Gabereau:
Yeah, but he doesn't... I know in life he's from Earth, but in the show is he from Earth?

Brad Wright:
No, in the show... The episode that we showed you is coming up this season. It's called "2010" and we were just presuming that in the future he... they were capable of taking that thing off.

Richard Dean Anderson:
See, I like telling the story that when casting we had to find someone with that emblem. [Laughter from the audience]

Brad Wright:
Actually, when we were casting and he walked in... Christopher is a massive man. I mean, his muscles are just huge and...

Vicki Gabereau:
But the best face... gorgeous face.

Brad Wright:
But Rick said, "Oh, could you please work out or something? Could you try?"

Richard Dean Anderson:
"Don't you care?"

Brad Wright:
"Don't you care?" It's very funny. [Laughter]

Vicki Gabereau:
[Referring to the Jaffa emblem] Well, I want one of those things.

Brad Wright:
We can get you one.

Vicki Gabereau:
They could have been a gimmick that you could have given away.

Brad Wright:
You mean merchandising. yeah, we could.

Richard Dean Anderson:
Yeah! [Laughing with Brad as if the idea had been discussed before]

Vicki Gabereau:
You want numbers, come to me. I'll tell you...

Brad Wright:
Actually, at one point MGM did sell those little stick-on things and they expected kids to run around with them on their foreheads.

Vicki Gabereau:
And they didn't actually work?

Brad Wright:
I didn't see anyone... no... no...

Vicki Gabereau:
Did you, when you were in school, is it really true that your film prof said, "Think of something else to do there, son, chiropractic maybe."?

Brad Wright:
[Laughing] No, it was funny, you know. I did an interview and the headline of that interview was "York Professor Says Wright Has No Talent," or something like that, and I don't remember ever saying that to the interviewer but...

Vicki Gabereau:
Maybe they phoned the professor?

Brad Wright:
That's true, maybe they did. Well, lots of people did say that. The thing is, I used to be an actor. So, I had made the right career choice in becoming a writer, there's no question.

Richard Dean Anderson:
I dunno...who knows?

Brad Wright:
He's trying to get me to do a small part on the show.

Vicki Gabereau:
Why don't you do it? Like a recurring, or just one?

Brad Wright:
Maybe one, maybe a dead body.

Vicki Gabereau:
Couldn't you say, "Would you like fries with that?"?

Richard Dean Anderson:
I don't think we could afford him though. [Rubbing his fingertips to indicate he would be expensive, and they laugh]

Vicki Gabereau:
Do you use lots of local actors?

Brad Wright:
Very much so, yes. We cast out of L.A. or Toronto if we can't find somebody here to fit that specific part. But, we've done four seasons on this show, and I did four seasons on...

Vicki Gabereau:
Have you used everyone in town?

Brad Wright:
We've used a lot of the people in town, and I know a lot of the actors. I mean, when we audition it's like, "Hi, how're doing again?" There's a huge talent pool and a growing talent pool. I've been here eleven years and it's amazing now. You can make a living in Vancouver now.

Vicki Gabereau:
Oh, absolutely.

Brad Wright:
In a way that you couldn't eleven or twelve years ago, [to Richard] when you were doing MacGyver.

Vicki Gabereau:
Well, you made a TV movie... Eyes of a Stranger?

Richard Dean Anderson:
Yeah, something like that.

Vicki Gabereau:
Oooo, you were scary. You're a nice guy in this and you were a nice guy on MacGyver, but you were a creep in that. And you know what? I thought that was one of the scariest movies I've ever seen. [To the audience] He played an architect that lived in the wall.

Richard Dean Anderson:
Don't they all?

Vicki Gabereau:
It was a wicked part.

Richard Dean Anderson:
It was fun.

Vicki Gabereau:
Fun?!

Richard Dean Anderson:
Yeah, it was!

Vicki Gabereau:
Honest to God, I had to leave the room.

Richard Dean Anderson:
I had been playing this Mr. Nice Guy for so long, you know, TV Hero Guy. A part of what I did very consciously after MacGyver was go out and start doing things that were increasingly dark... increasingly dark...er? [Looking to Brad for confirmation of the correct grammar]

Brad Wright:
"Darker."

Vicki Gabereau:
"Increasingly dark" would be fine.

Richard Dean Anderson:
They were just plain darker in nature. And I ended up playing eventually a cop who was abusive, another thing we shot up here. But that was a part of the whole transition. It was fun, nice to misbehave a little bit.

Vicki Gabereau:
Does it make you feel warm all over that it scared the bejesus out of me? And I'm a big grownup person!

Richard Dean Anderson:
Well, just as an actor it was important for me to do something like that. For no other reason than to test my credibility out there as "a actor."

Vicki Gabereau:
Of course. I understand. Yeah, I didn't keep saying "MacGyver" when you were doing that part, so that's a good thing.

Richard Dean Anderson:
Bless you.

Vicki Gabereau:
[Bringing the interview to a close, and holding up two fingers in a "V" peace sign] Okay, so well, may the... you know...

Brad Wright:
"May the Force be with you"?

Vicki Gabereau:
Peace. Or... [Moving her hands to imitate antennas] You know... whatever... [Laughter]

Richard Dean Anderson:
This is ours... [He holds his hands under his chin, wiggling his fingers in his own version of a signature gesture.]

Brad Wright:
That's what we do, yes. That's right! [He imitates Vicki's impression of antennas as the audience laughs.]

RDA on Vicki RDA on Vicki

Vicki Gabereau:
That's the way you do it? Yes, okay. [Demonstrating again, then turning to the audience to close the interview] Richard Dean Anderson and Brad Wright! He's the boss, sorta. Stargate SG-1!

[Cheers and applause as they go to a commercial]

____________________
Vicki Gabereau. October 27, 2000.


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